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The Whispering Man - Movie Review

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The Whispering Man

Frightful fun! 

As atmospheres change in a house, a camera is set up to record it all in The Whispering Man, a new horror movie from Wild Eye Releasing.  Borrowing a bit from The McPherson Tape when it comes to pacing, The Whispering Man works way better than expected thanks to solid characterizations (meaning that you don't hate the people involved in this flick) and its unique, atmospheric locations.

"the found footage phenomenon just keeps on rolling"


 

The painting of The Whispering Man, found in the attic of Mark (Dávid Fecske) and his brother, Tommy’s (András Korcsmáros) recently deceased grandmother, is a bit disturbing.  Don’t stare too long into its abyss, you know?  Something intoxicating is pulling you in.

Hell, the painting ought to come with a warning about its side effects to you and your house should you actually hang it on the wall.  The blue and gray swirls that make up the image of the face are quite haunting.  The bizarre painting invites all sorts of trouble.  Maybe it’s the hollow of the figure’s deep eyes.  They are like two dark wells bleeding through the night.

The disturbing nature of The Whispering Man painting is beyond concerning.  Mark is sure it is responsible for the downfall of his family and so, with the help of paranormal investigator Abel (Dávid Kiss), he sets out to document the disaster that befalls his own house when he brings the painting out of his grandmother’s attic and into his home.

BIG MISTAKE.

With gobs of chewy and cheeky quotes from past films - everything from The Room to The X-Files is referenced here - and with rolling blackouts and long, dark hallways, The Whispering Man is loaded with genuine laughs AND scares.  Mark believes the painting or something within the painting is trying to communicate with him.  His brother thinks he's nuts.  But whatever it is about the painting, keeps Mark turning on his camera at night and, trust me, the nighttime footage is stark raving mad with the bizarre stuff it captures.  The Whispering Man The Whispering Man, a Hungarian chiller that comes with a nice warning in front of it, proves that the horror sub-genre’s lasting effect on viewers can STILL be quite effective indeed.  You just need patience and a bit of humor when you go along for the ride, but here - with the hilarity firmly in place - enjoying this flick is damn easy.  With the highs and heavy breathing of The Whispering Man, the found footage phenomenon just keeps on rolling. 

Directed by József Gallai (Bodon) and written by Bálint Szántó (Gone), The Whispering Man was filmed in Veszprém, Hungary and, thanks in part to its location, creates an atmospheric tale that makes its creepiness universal and relatable as the terror comes in unexpected places - like the television (in one scene) - and its use of comedy to even out the edges.

This Lazy Cat Production is now available to rent or buy on-demand, Wild Eye Releasing is releasing The Whispering Man on DVD on June 30, 2020, so get those pre-orders ready on amazon.com because this creepy little shocker is worth it. 

Don't let him out!

4/5 stars

The Whispering Man

Blu-ray

Blu-ray Details:

Home Video Distributor:
Available on Blu-ray

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The Whispering Man

MPAA Rating: Unrated.
Runtime:
74 mins
Director
: József Gallai
Writer:
Bálint Szántó
Cast:
Dávid Fecske, András Korcsmáros, Ágota Dunai
Genre
: Horror | Thriller
Tagline:
Don't Let Him Out.
Memorable Movie Quote: "Oh, Hi Mark."
Distributor:
Wild Eye Releasing
Official Site: https://www.facebook.com/thesurrealproject
Release Date:
June 30, 2020
DVD/Blu-ray Release Date:
No details available.
Synopsis: After inheriting an ominous painting, a family soon becomes disturbed by a demonic presence known as The Whispering Man.

The Whispering Man

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