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Parallax - Movie Review

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Parallax

Displacement.  That’s EXACTLY what Parallax, a psychodrama science fiction thriller from writer and director Michael W. Bachochin (Cascadia; God Forgive Us), is about as a young artist wakes up to a life she doesn’t recognize.  She doesn’t respond to relatives.  She doesn’t react to the touch of her lover.  Everything is blank.

"there is a thin line between what is and what isn’t real and that is where the science fiction aspect of this meditative movie comes into play.  Be prepared to go deep"


Naomi (Naomi Prentice) is a painter who has lost the desire to paint.  Hell, she’s so listless about all things that all she can do is apologize.  No memories.  Nothing true.  Nothing false.  Everything just is . . . which makes her poker face and her fiancée’s patience with her a bit of a challenge to stick with.  Just like him, I am left asking why?

All I can say is that you should pay CLOSE attention to the details in Parallax.  All of them.  Because there is a thin line between what is and what isn’t real and that is where the science fiction aspect of this meditative movie comes into play.  Be prepared to go deep.

To complicate things, every single time she starts to look at a canvas, she witnesses herself drowning.  With each stroke, there is the sound of more and more waves washing over her body as she struggles to breathe.  Something is out of sorts with her.  Is it a false reality?  An echo of what used to be?  She can hardly feel herself enough to know. {googleads}

Naomi wanders aimlessly through her day, ignoring Lucas (Nelson Ritthaler), her fiancée, and sometimes - when she really tries - she can manage a painting . . . of a beach.  None of this helps her water-obsessed dreams or her current dysfunction. He has his memories of her, but she shares none of them. 

Fortunately, not everything is as it seems.  Just hang tight.

While slow by design, Bacholochin’s film explores difficult territory as Naomi, expertly portrayed by Prentice, tries her best to reach out from the depths and remember what Lucas remembers of her.  With the help of Dr. Hill (Ted Gianopulos), maybe she can get back to being herself.  Strong photography leads the way to possible recovery as cinematographer Connor Heck explores the sights and sounds of the ocean as they relate to a person’s memory of self. Parallax

According to Lucas, Naomi went to sleep and woke up in the middle of this ongoing psychotic episode.  She went to bed normal and woke up the next day like this: shellshocked.  All she tells him is that she went to the beach

This Primal Group production stars Naomi Prentice, Nelson Ritthaler, Hattie Smith (The Axiom) and Ted Gianopulos.  Produced by Bachochin, Brooke Lorraine and Yuself Baig and released by October Coast, Parallax - which isn’t for the casual viewer - enjoys a limited run in select theaters starting this week.

Dive deep.

3/5 stars

Parallax

Blu-ray

Blu-ray Details:

Home Video Distributor:
Available on Blu-ray

Screen Formats:
Subtitles
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Audio:

Discs:
Region Encoding:

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Parallax

MPAA Rating:
Runtime:

Director
: Michael Bachochin
Writer:
Michael Bachochin
Cast:
Naomi Prentice, Nelson Ritthaler, Hattie Smith
Genre
: Sci-Fi
Tagline:
The Primal Group Presents.
Memorable Movie Quote: "How many days does it take to open your eyes?"
Theatrical Distributor:
MGM
Official Site: https://www.parallaxmovie.us/
Release Date:
Theaters, Drive-ins July 10, 2020
DVD/Blu-ray Release Date:

Synopsis:A young artist wakes up in a life that she doesn't recognize, spending her time asleep haunted by nightmares of drowning in a black abysmal void. As she begins to uncover the truths of the life that she's found herself in, the gravity of her failing reality weighs heavily on her psychological identity and the reliability of her sanity is called into question.

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Parallax

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