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Doctor Who: Deep Breath - TV Review

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Doctor Who: Deep Breath - Episode Review

4 stars

Scotland’s own Peter Capaldi seems - regionally speaking only - an ill fit in Doctor Who’s shoes.  The opposite; however, is the reality.  He is exciting in the role of the twelfth Doctor, a beloved time-traveling Time Lord alien who regenerates when beyond repair, and will likely bring more viewers to the fold due to his commanding presence as he grows into the role.  Capaldi is no stranger to the mythos of the show as he has appeared in past episodes of David Tennant’s run and in Torchwood.  His presence as the new Doctor ushers in a whole new feel to the program with curious nods to the classic run of the program.  

Deep Breath, the 8th season opener, sees the good Doctor and Clara, his lovely companion played by Jenna Coleman, arriving in Victorian era England along with a slightly confused Tyrannosaurus Rex.  It seems that the now frightened T-rex swallowed the TARDIS and was transported to England with it.  Just when the citizens acknowledge that life along the Thames couldn’t get any more bizarre, clockwork robots harvesting human organs for spare parts  make their presence known.  The Doctor must deal with them (and the T-rex situation, though this resolves itself) once he recovers from the affects of his regeneration.  Rose, who is having a tough time of accepting the Doctor’s new (but old) face, must deal with her own feelings.


“I’m not your boyfriend,” The Doctor tells Clara and, with that proclamation, Doctor Who’s show runner and Deep Breath writer Stephen Moffat tidies up the rampant flirting of Tennant and Matt Smith with their companions.  The romance is over.  Capaldi’s Doctor will hear none of it.  As troubled as he is, he simply does not have time for close maneuvers in the dark or heavy petting.  This move will make some rejoice and may let the relationshippers down.  For them, I suggest weeping over their fan fiction.  This is The Doctor we have been longing for.

Directed by Ben Wheatley, the filmmaker responsible for a horror movie entitled Kill List and the black comedy SightseersDeep Breath is exactly the type of science fiction thriller needed to propel Capaldi’s charms forward.   While it is too soon to tell exactly how moody this incarnation will be, there are signs here that indicate Capaldi’s time as The Doctor could be legendary.  The season opener is equally terrifying and funny with only a couple of weak moments involving the Paternoster Gang.  

Muffat adjusts the themes to reflect the new Doctor.  There are one-liners but they are darker and wittier.  Gone are the boyish aspects of the last two Doctors.  Capaldi is the veritable elder statesman returned and, complete with furrowed brow, tackles a very serious issue involving old foes and a new team-up.  

There is a chance that Clara and the new Doctor will not always get along; this is good news for Coleman.  She needs a chance to show Doctor Who fans what she can really do as the companion.  All that is hinted at in Deep Breath and a final appearance from Smith in the role of The Doctor helps seal the deal for all the weeping shippers out there.  It is a touching moment that is necessary so Capaldi can assume his duties.

With Deep Breath, The Doctor is in!

Doctor Who: Deep Breath - Movie Review

MPAA Rating: Not rated
Runtime:
79 mins
Director
: Ben Wheatley
Writer:
Steven Moffat
Cast:
Peter Capaldi, Jenna Coleman, Neve McIntosh
Genre
: TV
Tagline:
Doctor Who
Memorable Movie Quote:
Distributor:
BBC Cymru Wales
Official Site: http://www.bbcamerica.com/doctor-who/
Release Date:
April 26, 2004
DVD/Blu-ray Release Date:
August 23, 2014 (BBC)
Synopsis: When the doctor arrives in Victorian London he finds a dinosaur rampant in the Thames and a spate of deadly spontaneous combustions.

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